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 We are accepting submissions of flash fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction to Issue 11 until midnight EST December 7. Submissions of visual art will be accepted until midnight EST December 21. We are not accepting short story submissions this time around as the winners of the Fiction Prize will be published in Issue 11, but we are accepting flash fiction submissions of 750 words or less. 

Payment to contributors is $5 per printed page of the magazine + one copy of the magazine.

Until we reach our Submittable-allotted monthly free submissions limit, there is no fee to submit but our free submissions fill up extremely fast. Thereafter you may submit via the Tip Jar but free submissions will resume on February 1st to Issue 12. Tip Jar submissions are a vital source of the income that allows us to run day-to-day, and are hugely appreciated.

Submissions are read blind--do not include any identifying information in your submission document, document title, or the title in the Submittable form.

Please only submit to one category per reading period, unless you are submitting via the Tip Jar, in which case there is no limit to how many times you may submit and how many categories you may submit to. 

Please make sure your submission is as you want it to be before you submit, as submissions cannot be edited once submitted.

If you are withdrawing only one piece of a multiple-piece submission, please leave a note in your submission instead of withdrawing it and re-submitting, as this uses up our monthly free submissions limit.

Editor-in-Chief Philip Elliott will provide an in-depth analysis of your story of up to 7,500 words in big-picture terms (for more info on this and the other services Philip offers, visit https://paragoneditingservices.com/).

What is a Developmental Edit?

You will learn more from a thorough developmental edit of your story than any number of writing workshops.


Developmental editing is the intensive and thorough examination of your story in big picture terms, focusing on the core intentions and goals of the story, the premise, the impact of the opening and ending, the economy and value of scenes in the middle, plot and character arcs, character development, pacing, what is essential/inessential, tension, intrigue, dialogue, language, imagery, sensory description, style, tone, narrative voice—the craft of the story and artistic intentions of the work.

When Does My Story Need a Developmental Edit?

When you have taken your story as far as you can by yourself but it is not finished to the standard you want it to be, or when you are not having much luck getting a story or stories published.

What is the Process?

I will read your story through several times looking at it from different angles and taking detailed notes under multiple headings, consolidating these notes into a clear, in-depth, and easy-to-understand review.


The review will offer examples of areas in the story that need work, with possible solutions, as well as highlighting what you’re doing right. I will also insert these extensive notes directly on your manuscript with Microsoft Word’s Track Changes function at each area to which they apply, making it easy for you to read/flick through your manuscript page by page and see each comment in chronological order.

How Long Does it Take?

 The current turnaround is about six weeks.

Editor-in-Chief Philip Elliott will provide an in-depth analysis of your use of language in your short story of up to 7,500 words (for more info on this and the other services Philip offers, visit https://paragoneditingservices.com/).

What is a Line Edit?

You will learn more from a thorough line edit of your manuscript than any number of writing workshops.


Line editing distinguishes professional from amateur writing. It addresses the creative content, writing style, and language use of your story at the sentence and paragraph level. Line editing does not comb your story for errors (that’s what copyediting is for) but looks at the way you use language to communicate your story to your reader.


  • Is the language of your story clear, fluid, and easy to read? 
  • Does it convey a consistent sense of atmosphere, emotion, and tone? 
  • Is your word choice accurate and appropriate, free of generalizations and clichés? 
  • Do redundant and overused words litter your story, or excessive adverbs and description? 
  • Does your manuscript contain run-on sentences and sentences that could be phrased more clearly and concisely? 
  • Is your story lacking in vivid sensory description? 
  • Are you overwriting, trying too hard to make your sentences beautiful that you’ve drowned your story under purple prose
  • Is your language overly plain and dull? Could passages and scenes be paced more effectively?

When Does My Story Need a Line Edit?

Line editing is the final step before submitting your story to an agent or publishing house, after you have finished writing the scenes and chapters that make up the story. The revisions you make to your story following a line edit will become the final draft. Line editing is the polish that lifts your story from great to excellent and can be the difference between it being accepted or rejected. The short story line edit can be a huge help when you are not having much luck getting a story or stories published.

What is the Process?

I will read your story through several times, combing each sentence, passage, and scene of your manuscript slowly and carefully several times, ensuring that I catch each area where the language could be improved.


The line edit is performed directly on your manuscript with Microsoft Word’s Track Changes function. Prepare for your manuscript to be covered in edits and comments explaining the edits! You will be able to flick through your manuscript edit by edit in chronological order, choosing to accept or reject each. Crucially, a line edit will not change your story unless you implement the advised changes.

How long Does it Take?

 The current turnaround is about six weeks. 

Editor-in-Chief Philip Elliott will provide an in-depth analysis of your short story of up to 7,500 words in big-picture terms and your use of language (for more info on this and the other services Philip offers, visit https://paragoneditingservices.com/).

What is the Short Story Package?

 The Short Story Package is the quickest way to drastically improve your story and everything you write thereafter. You will learn more from it than any number of writing workshops.


The Short Story Package is a combination of developmental editing and line editing for short stories of up to 7,500 words. Developmental editing is the intensive and thorough examination of your story in big picture terms, focusing on the core intentions and goals of the story, the premise, the impact of the opening and ending, the economy and value of scenes in the middle, plot and character arcs, character development, pacing, what is essential/inessential, tension, intrigue, dialogue, language, imagery, sensory description, style, tone, narrative voice—the craft of the story and artistic intentions of the work.


Line editing distinguishes professional from amateur writing. It addresses the creative content, writing style, and language use of your story at the sentence and paragraph level. Line editing does not comb your story for errors (that’s what copyediting is for) but looks at the way you use language to communicate your story to your reader.


  • Is the language of your story clear, fluid, and easy to read? 
  • Does the language convey a consistent sense of atmosphere, emotion, and tone? 
  • Is your word choice accurate and appropriate, free of generalizations and clichés? 
  • Do redundant and overused words litter your story, or excessive adverbs and description? 
  • Does your manuscript contain run-on sentences and sentences that could be phrased more clearly and concisely? 
  • Is your story lacking in vivid sensory description? 
  • Are you overwriting, trying too hard to make your sentences beautiful that you’ve drowned your story under purple prose
  • Is your language overly plain and dull? Could passages and scenes be paced more effectively?

When Does My Story Need the Short Story Package?

When you have taken your story as far as you can by yourself but it is not to the standard you want it to be, or when you are not having much luck getting a story or stories published.

What is the Process?

I will read your story through several times looking at it from different angles and taking detailed notes under multiple headings, consolidating these notes into a clear, in-depth, and easy-to-understand review, as well as combing each sentence, passage, and scene of your manuscript slowly and carefully several times, ensuring I catch each area where the language could be improved.


The developmental edit will offer examples of areas in the story that need work, with possible solutions, as well as highlighting what you’re doing right, and takes the form of in-depth notes on big picture elements that cover the story as a whole and scene to scene. The line edit is performed directly on your manuscript with Microsoft Word’s Track Changes function. Prepare for your manuscript to be covered in edits and comments explaining the edits! You will be able to flick through your manuscript edit by edit in chronological order, choosing to accept or reject each. Crucially, a line edit will not change your story unless you implement the advised changes.

How Long Does it Take?

 The current turnaround is about six weeks. 

Editor-in-Chief Philip Elliott will provide an in-depth analysis of the first thirty pages of your novel in big-picture terms and your use of language (for more info on this and the other services Philip offers, visit https://paragoneditingservices.com/).

What is the First Thirty Package?

The First Thirty Package is the quickest way to drastically improve the opening of your novel, your novel as a whole, and your writing in general. You will learn more from it than any number of writing workshops, and can apply these skills to everything you write thereafter.


The first thirty pages of your novel or novella is commonly what an agent or publishing house will require of you when submitting your novel for consideration. This means it is crucial the first thirty pages of your story are the best they can be, capable of hooking the agent or editor’s interest right away. The First Thirty Package is a combination of developmental and line editing for the first thirty pages of your novel.

A developmental edit is an examination of the effectiveness of the opening of your story, focusing on the the premise, economy of words, characterization, what is essential/inessential, tension, intrigue, dialogue, language, imagery, sensory description, style, tone, narrative voice—the craft of the opening and how effective it is at hooking your reader.

Line editing distinguishes professional from amateur writing. It addresses the creative content, writing style, and language use of the opening of your story’s opening at the sentence and paragraph level. Line editing does not comb your opening for errors (that’s what copyediting is for) but looks at the way you use language to communicate your story to your reader: 

  • Is the language of your story’s opening clear, fluid, and easy to read? 
  • Does the langauge convey a consistent sense of atmosphere, emotion, and tone? 
  • Is your word choice accurate and appropriate, free of generalizations and clichés? 
  • Do redundant and overused words litter your opening, or excessive adverbs and description? 
  • Does your opening contain run-on sentences and sentences that could be phrased more clearly and concisely? 
  • Is your opening lacking in vivid sensory description? 
  • Are you overwriting, trying too hard to make your sentences beautiful that you’ve drowned your opening under purple prose
  • Is your language overly plain and dull? Could passages and scenes be paced more effectively?

When Does My Novel’s Opening Need the First Thirty Package?

When you have taken your novel or novella as far as you can by yourself and are ready to submit it to agents or publishers, or when you are not receiving much interest in your novel from agents and publishers.

What is the Process?

I will read your story’s opening through several times looking at it from different angles and taking detailed notes under multiple headings, consolidating these notes into a clear, in-depth, and easy-to-understand review, as well as combing each sentence, passage, and scene of your manuscript slowly and carefully several times, ensuring I catch each area where the language could be improved.


The development edit of the opening of your story will offer examples of areas in the story that need work, with possible solutions, as well as highlighting what you’re doing right, and takes the form of in-depth notes. The line edit is performed directly on your manuscript with Microsoft Word’s Track Changes function. Prepare for your manuscript to be covered in edits and comments explaining the edits! You will be able to flick through your manuscript edit by edit in chronological order, choosing to accept or reject each. Crucially, a line edit will not change your manuscript unless you implement the advised changes.

How Long Does it Take?

The current turnaround is about six weeks.

Into the Void